Jul 162012
 

Coming soon: Australian Lunar Series II – 2012 Year of the Dragon 1oz Silver Coloured (Blue) Edition

  • Specimen quality 99.9% pure silver coloured coin
  • Australian legal tender
  • Extremely limited edition – 5,000
  • Sydney ANDA Coin Show packaging
  • Numbered Certificate of Authenticity

SPECIAL PRICE FOR THOSE ATTENDING
THE SYDNEY ANDA COIN SHOW OF $90.00

Venue: Canterbury Racecourse, Canterbury
Dates: 18th and 19th August 2012

 

  18 Responses to “Sydney Coin Show Special”

  1. I think people are starting to get bored with the dragons now…

     
  2. To address the comment made above… The only reason people are getting tired of the dragon is because WE ARE IN THE YEAR OF THE DRAGON! Once 2013 comes and the Year of the Snake coins start to flood the net, these Dragon coins are going to shoot WAYY WAYY UP!! Just keep buying and holdddd! Also this blue version of the Dragon is one that you CAN NOT MISS! People have offered me $150 to pull my blue dragon out of my 10 coin set but I would NOT part with this coin for under $200. PERTH MINT YOU ROCK!

     
  3. People are getting bored because Perth Mint is not coming up with new design of the dragon coin (not even adding a privy). Instead they just recycle or add to the same existing coin, dilute and increase the mintage and put it in ANDA box. Pricing it at $99 (after the show) for a non-proof coin & a very high 5000 mintage (in addition to 9 coin set, 10 coin set) also add to deterring collectors to purchase it.

    A recent Melbourne ANDA lunar coin just sold on in after market for $76, over $20 below official issue price. This tells us how far the specimen coin (essentially a coloured bullion) has fallen and yet Perth Mint is still increasing the mintage and not lowering the price.

    I think Perth Mint needs to stop milking the dragon. The big dragon has been exhausted. It is time to bring out the snake or the little dragon.

     
    • I think its true that they are milking people. It is time some new designs are put out, or just move to the snake. I don’t need to see multiple rainbow of dragons, I have passed on the last ANDA release for exact same reason too.

      They mixed things up with the map shaped coins and they did super well, new designs will bring in new customers and keep the old ones happy. win all around.

       
  4. 5,000 coins isn’t a huge mintage, even if you add it to what has been released in the 9 and 10 coin sets.

    I think the only reason people may be a bit disappointed is that the price of spot silver has dropped.

    If silver had of continued at around the mod 40’s you wouldn’t be tires of the coloured dragon coins, believe me.

    imo, the ten coins set would have been selling for $1500 – $1800 and the ANDA coins would be over 200 bucks.

    Remember that the 5oz ANDA Red Dragon was selling on the secondary market for upwards of $499 but when 2oz coins from Germany flooded the market the coin took a sharp decline.

    It would have been nice for Perth to advise the market that individual 2oz red coloured dragon coins were available as bullion coins but the most important thing that Perth must correct is their wording of what is bullion and what is a specimen coin.

    Perth have said that any couloured coin is a specimen coin but in the same breaath they call the coloured coins bullion coins.

    How can a roll of 5 x 2oz red coloured coins be called bullion but then if the same coin is put in a box with coa and shipper it’s classed as a specimen coin?

    The anomaly lies with the EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

    Currency Act 1965

    Currency (Perth Mint) Determination

    Perth needs to re-word their Explanatory statement to reflect the description on the collector web site.

    Coins on the bullion site are also conusing because Perth says that any coin that has undergone a treatment or modification is a Specimen coin. So, the only coins that are true bullion coins are those that don’t have a privy mark or colourization.

    If indeed coloured coins are bullion coins they should be available on the Bullion web site; they aren’t.

    So Perth you really need to fix your interpretation of what’s bullion and what’s a Specimen coin!

    You really shouldn’t be selling a coloured dragon coin as a specimen coin if the coin is a coloured bullion coin.

    Here’s how to fix the problem.

    Make a statement that says, all boxed coins on the collector site are individually selected and graded by Perth.

    ANDA should be involved in hand grading each coin before it is boxed. Graders can quickly grade your coloured coins and then you sell them for the price on your collector web site.

    If you don’t grade them or they aren’t hand picked they are no different to the thousands of coins you minted for the Chinese and Germans.

    Not that is very poor relations when a bloke pays top dollar on the secondary market for an ANDA coin and then a few weeks later the same coin can be had from Europe in a tube of 20 or as in the 2oz Red coloured Dragon a tube of 5.

    Please fix this anomaly, lets have true collector coins for the collectors.

    Kind regards

    Billy Black Smith

     
  5. agree with comment above – way too many dragons the same. Different designs please for snakes, not just different colours!

     
  6. just simple, don’t buy. now, with the “weird” pricing and mintage strategy we must make a careful selection what must we spend our precious money…

     
  7. In response to the above I would say the market for Lunar Dragons is clearly showing signs of saturation and for more reasons than the same design which has been released extensively in different variations of size and finish since its release in September 2011.

    Another aspect is the additional mintages due to various custom orders which resulted in furious responses of collectors as well as silver stackers for obvious reasons.
    Even more so when it became unclear whether we are dealing with a specimen coin or just an ordinary coloured bullion coin. As Billy pointed out the anomaly lies with the explanatory statement of the ‘Currency Act 1965’. Following this it means that the current coins which are defined as specimen coins are actually coloured bullion coins.

    But what are actually specimen coins?

    As far I know there is no real authority around which defines coins as specimen coins. However on the internet some definitions can be found and I noticed a resemblance which reminded me of the 3 types of silver Eagles which are on the marked; BU, ‘Burnished’, and Proof.
    A few years ago I have read an article about the ‘Burnished’ Eagles and contrary to the BU, or similar to the Proof, these coins have been struck at least twice. To produce specimen coins the dies and blanks are specially polished and treated in such a way that coins have a shinier (or specific satin ‘burnished’) look and has sharper images and rims. The aim is to produce a coin that looks like a BU but has a superior quality.
    I have to make note that I have not found any reference mentioning that additions like a privy or colourisations are determining a coin to be a specimen coin.

    Considering the definition provided on this blog site it makes sense to find answers on the following and hopefully the Blog Team can provide them(??).

    When specimen coins of the Perth Mint have undergone different treatment, is this similar to what has been described above?
    If not, what is meant specifically by ‘features one or more special numismatic treatments’ besides coloured/gilded/gemstone?

    Mentioning the definition on this site it appears that it contains a significant, somewhat misleading, discrepancy and additionally, releasing a bullion coin in a packaging does not changed the fact that the coin itself is still a bullion coin.

    Further, as Billy mentioned grading, it is striking that grading agencies like NGC and PCGS are not recognising the Perth Mint specimen coins. All of them have been graded as MS and not as SP or no other reference is made on the labels to point out it concerns a special coin.

    On the proposed solution of having the specimen coins graded in cooperation ANDA and individually selected before being listed on the collectors site I would like to add that this will most likely result in an increase of the release price. Creating a repeating selection process involving an external independent party is a costly matter and still does not clearly distinguishes the differences discussed here.

    Another less costly solution might be found in the similar way you can distinguish the difference between ‘burnished’ and BU Eagles; simply add a different mint mark on the specimen coin.
    E.g., instead of only the regular ‘P’ add an asterisk (*) or the letter ‘s’ to the mint mark: P* , Ps.

    This solution is easy to implement and apart from some additional production costs it requires only an investment for new dies.

    In my view this solution would not only take away the discussion permanently but it would be a great marketing opportunity if the Perth Mint is considering this.

    In addition it provides the Perth Mint the opportunity to distinguish themselves on the market rather than using spin-off coins which were used for custom orders already.
    I guess considering all the complaints the latter has been proven to be poor marketing.

    I am convinced that if the Perth Mint starts releasing specimen coins with special mint mark it will draw the attention of both new and existing customers.

    Mzzl,

    Mokum

     
  8. Dear Perth Mint,

    Besides the Blue Colourised Bullion dragon coin and the usual wheat sheaf coin, what other coins can we expect to be announced at Sydney ANDA show in August?

    Won’t it be great if Perth Mint announces a surprise proof coin such as a limited edition of Lunar snake as an inaugural release?

    Without a surprise coin, these ANDA show is loosing its prestige.

     
    • Hi Goblue

      Just the Blue Dragon special from The Perth Mint. Regarding the show, Andrew Crellin recently posted: “The ANDA Committee had a couple of meetings over the course of the weekend to discuss plans on the steps we can take to improve the value that the ANDA shows offer, keep your eyes peeled for a few announcements about our ideas on the shows to be held in 2013 – they’re quite exciting!”

      Regards

      Blog Team

       
  9. For those who are interested but are not familiar with it yet…

    Look up on internet:
    EXPLANATORY STATEMENT, Currency Act 1965, Currency (Perth Mint) Determination 2011 (No. 3)
    (Checking for updates is required…)

    Here you can find anything what to expect from the upcoming release of the Lunar Year of the Snake 2013.

    Besides size, finish, and types, it describes the design as well.

    After reading some of you will be happy and others won’t but I guess the Perth Mint can not make everybody happy all the time…

    Enjoy the reading.

    Mzzl,

    Mokum

     
    • Hi Mokum

      Some observations in response (see italics):

      In response to the above I would say the market for Lunar Dragons is clearly showing signs of saturation and for more reasons than the same design which has been released extensively in different variations of size and finish since its release in September 2011.

      We do acknowledge that to many collectors it must seem as though the market is “saturated” with Dragon coins. However, The Perth Mint is an Australian business serving a global clientele – between 80 and 90% of our products are shipped overseas annually. Thus our programs are designed for a range of international markets. Yet we are obliged and indeed very pleased to offer all Australian legal tender products at home in Australia. So, if a program is developed specifically for a distributor in (for example) China, we will offer a small percentage of the mintage here.

      Thus Australian collectors are unique in as much as they have the opportunity to purchase every variation of our Australian programs. Many welcome the chance to acquire products developed for overseas markets; for others it is a bit of a bugbear, as some of these comments make plain.

      Another aspect is the additional mintages due to various custom orders which resulted in furious responses of collectors as well as silver stackers for obvious reasons.

      Even more so when it became unclear whether we are dealing with a specimen coin or just an ordinary coloured bullion coin. As Billy pointed out the anomaly lies with the explanatory statement of the ‘Currency Act 1965’. Following this it means that the current coins which are defined as specimen coins are actually coloured bullion coins.

      But what are actually specimen coins?

      The bullion coin program we developed for launch in 1987 was differentiated from other international offerings by a triple strike ‘reverse proof’ finish. It is considerably higher quality than a traditional bullion coin finish – so much so that many people love to collect them.

      We continue to apply the term bullion because they are manufactured in large volumes and are sold at tight margins – offering investors extremely cost-effective ways of buying gold and silver. The point is we do break the commonly held definition of the term ‘bullion’, and when we introduced the term ‘specimen’ we always said that the meaning it conveyed was unique to The Perth Mint.

      As far I know there is no real authority around which defines coins as specimen coins. However on the internet some definitions can be found and I noticed a resemblance which reminded me of the 3 types of silver Eagles which are on the marked; BU, ‘Burnished’, and Proof.

      A few years ago I have read an article about the ‘Burnished’ Eagles and contrary to the BU, or similar to the Proof, these coins have been struck at least twice. To produce specimen coins the dies and blanks are specially polished and treated in such a way that coins have a shinier (or specific satin ‘burnished’) look and has sharper images and rims. The aim is to produce a coin that looks like a BU but has a superior quality.

      I have to make note that I have not found any reference mentioning that additions like a privy or colourisations are determining a coin to be a specimen coin.

      Considering the definition provided on this blog site it makes sense to find answers on the following and hopefully the Blog Team can provide them(??).

      When specimen coins of the Perth Mint have undergone different treatment, is this similar to what has been described above?

      If not, what is meant specifically by ‘features one or more special numismatic treatments’ besides coloured/gilded/gemstone?

      By our definition, a specimen coin has a frosted background with either an element of colour, an element of gilding, the insertion of a gemstone or another finish or treatment (e.g. antiquing) somewhere on the reverse. A specially prepared die is required in most cases. Moreover, a specimen coin is marketed as a collectable issue with a higher margin than an investment bullion coin.

      In the case of 2oz Coloured Dragons mentioned by Billy Black Smith – these products were made for an international distributor who did not take up as much of the mintage as originally anticipated. We offered a small number as Coin Show Specials (as per our obligation to offer the product in Australia) and wholesaled the remainder to dealers who could have offered them as ‘bullion with colour’ – admittedly, a confusing twist to this story.

      Mentioning the definition on this site it appears that it contains a significant, somewhat misleading, discrepancy and additionally, releasing a bullion coin in a packaging does not changed the fact that the coin itself is still a bullion coin.

      No, but the whole tenor of the product is changed by packaging. It becomes a limited collectable. As stated above, the values implied by our use of the word specimen are unique to us and have nothing in common with the definitions prescribed by US grading agencies.

      Further, as Billy mentioned grading, it is striking that grading agencies like NGC and PCGS are not recognising the Perth Mint specimen coins. All of them have been graded as MS and not as SP or no other reference is made on the labels to point out it concerns a special coin.

      On the proposed solution of having the specimen coins graded in cooperation ANDA and individually selected before being listed on the collectors site I would like to add that this will most likely result in an increase of the release price. Creating a repeating selection process involving an external independent party is a costly matter and still does not clearly distinguishes the differences discussed here.

      Another less costly solution might be found in the similar way you can distinguish the difference between ‘burnished’ and BU Eagles; simply add a different mint mark on the specimen coin.

      E.g., instead of only the regular ‘P’ add an asterisk (*) or the letter ‘s’ to the mint mark: P* , Ps.

      This solution is easy to implement and apart from some additional production costs it requires only an investment for new dies.

      This suggestion is well worth considering and we’ve taken it on board. There are some issues in so far as we work ahead and coins for future release are already with Treasury for approval but further afield this may prove to be a practical, attractive initiative.

      In my view this solution would not only take away the discussion permanently but it would be a great marketing opportunity if the Perth Mint is considering this.

      In addition it provides the Perth Mint the opportunity to distinguish themselves on the market rather than using spin-off coins which were used for custom orders already.

      I guess considering all the complaints the latter has been proven to be poor marketing.

      I am convinced that if the Perth Mint starts releasing specimen coins with special mint mark it will draw the attention of both new and existing customers.

      Thanks for all your comments and feedback which we hope to continue receiving going forward.

      Kind regards

      Blog Team

       
  10. I worry about if they will do the same thing for the snake.

     
  11. SYDNEY ANDA COIN SHOW SPECIAL – AUSTRALIAN LUNAR SERIES II – 2012 YEAR OF THE DRAGON 1OZ SILVER COLOURED EDITION

    ON SALE NOW!!!!!

    http://www.perthmint.com.au/catalogue/sydney-anda-coin-show-special-australian-lunar-series-ii-2012-year-of-the-dragon-1oz-silver-coloured-edition.aspx

     

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