Jan 162018
 

At the end of the First World War, the Australian Government launched a series of ‘Peace Loan’ campaigns. These were managed by the Commonwealth Bank of Australia with the aim of recouping the costs of the war and helping to fund the pensions of returned servicemen. In the same way War Loans had functioned between 1915 and 1918, the public was asked to purchase bonds which were repaid with interest.

The first peace loan was announced on 30 July 1919. The amount requested was £25 million, equivalent to approximately £1.1 billion today. As with the war loans campaigns, promotional posters were developed and published in newspapers encouraging the general public to get involved.

One of the first subscribers to the second peace loan issued in July 1920 was Edward VIII, the Prince of Wales, who later became King Edward VIII. The Prince was travelling around Australia at the time thanking the population for the sacrifices and contributions they had made during the war. The third and final loan, known as the ‘Diggers Loan’, was launched in August 1921.

Australian Posters of World War I – Peace Bonds
2018 1oz Silver Proof Rectangle Coin

The fifth and final release from the Australian Posters of World War I coin series features a poster from the initial Peace Bonds promotional campaign of 1919.

The poster depicted a young veteran in uniform being welcomed back to civilian life by an elderly farmer declaring “Well Boy – You’ve done your Bit. What will Australia do for You?” The artwork symbolised that even those who had not been not eligible for recruitment could still make a useful contribution to their country.

Vividly portrayed in colour on the rectangular 1oz silver coin, it is headed by the inscription AUSTRALIAN PEACE BONDS.

Click for more information about the complete Australian Posters of World War I series.

Reflecting the development of a recognisably Australian style in poster art and its effectiveness as an advertising and promotional medium at the beginning of the 20th century, this series is produced by The Perth Mint in association with the Australian War Memorial. Issued as Australian legal tender, each coin in the special series is individually encapsulated in latex cases which allows the design on both sides to be displayed.

No more than 5,000 of each coin in the series will be released worldwide.


The Australian War Memorial logo is a registered trade mark of the Australian War Memorial TM © 2018.


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  2 Responses to “Superb World War I coin series closes with fitting peace poster release”

  1. Hello Blog Team,
    Excuse me, if my request here might not be in the right place, but I did not know where else, I did not find the subject Lunar coins.

    I have a question for a 1 oz Lunar Series 1, silver coin.
    It is the issue 1 oz Pig silver coin from 2007, exactly the motive gilded.

    I have buy a coin this shows the coin image the issue “Pig gilded” with the shiny tendrils around the edge.

    At this coin, however the the pig and the foliage under the pig’s feet is matte!! (and not gilded!) So it looks the same like the background of the coin.

    My question: Is it possible that something like that can happen during production?
    O, have been made at the Perth Mint samples, model, specimen or similar produced, which correspond to this type? But did not come to the issue or production? But still a coin has entered the market?

    I have examined my coin, also in comparison with the normal issue 1 oz Pig silver (bullion) and 1 oz Pig silver gilded, under a coin microscope with up to 15x magnification. A manipulation is not recognizable and for me therefore as well as excluded.

    Unfortunately I can here in the blog do not attach a picture, if you send me an e-mail address to which I can send a picture, i would send a good, high resolution picture.

    I would be very very very happy about a reply on my request.

    And please….. please excuse my bad English, i write from Germany.

    Kind regards

    lunarcollector

     

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