Blog Team

The Perth Mint Blog Team has its finger on the pulse! We work in marketing, PR and creative services. So if there’s anything newsworthy or novel happening around The Perth Mint, we’re here to make sure you hear about it first!

Jul 232014
 

The correct answer to our latest Mystery Coin competition is:

Ships That Changed The World – Cutty Sark 2012 1oz Silver Proof Coin.

Cutty_Sark

Cutty Sark‘s name derives from Robert Burns’ famous poem Tam O’ Shanter about a farmer called Tam who is chased by a witch dressed only in a ‘cutty sark’ – an old Scottish name for a short nightdress. The witch was portrayed as a figurehead on Cutty Sark’s bow.

The famous ship was badly damaged by fire in 2007 while undergoing conservation, but has since been restored and was reopened to the public in Greenwich, London in April 2012.

Built in 1869, Cutty Sark was one of the fastest clippers to transport tea from China to London. But with the growing success of steam ships on the shorter Suez Canal route, she turned to the trade in wool from Australia, where she held the record time to Britain for 10 years.

Congratulations to the following winners who submitted correct answers on Facebook or email (via the blog post):

  • Stephen Grieshaber
  • Harbeen Kaur
  • Heidi Layland
  • Vicki Emanuel
  • Steve Garlesky

If you didn’t win this time, please watch our Facebook page and blog for another Mystery Coin competition in the not too distant future.

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Jul 212014
 

Celebrating 25 years of the iconic red kangaroo design, the spectacular 2014 gold coins shown in this video feature the original artistry by Dr Stuart Devlin AO CMG, goldsmith and jeweller to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

Collectors interested in securing the 25th Anniversary Five-Coin Set or individual 1oz and 1/4oz pure gold proof coins depicting the red kangaroo design should visit our website by clicking here.

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Jul 152014
 

Consider the clues below. Then search The Perth Mint website to find a pure silver coin depicting the subject they relate to.

Mystery_Coin2Clues:

  • Look to poet Robert Burns for the origin of my name.
  • On the topic of burns, I was recently rescued from a devastating fire.
  • My fame derives from swift shipments of tea and wool.

 

Start your search for the mystery coin here: http://www.perthmint.com.au

How To Enter

Once you think you’ve identified the correct coin on the website, email the complete product title to contest@perthmint.com.au marking your reply ‘July 2014 Mystery Coin Competition’ in the subject line. Entries close on 21 July 2014. Eligible entrants will be included in the free draw and winners will be notified by email. (Terms & Conditions.)

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Jul 132014
 

One of the beauties of coins and medallions is their ability to preserve fascinating moments in history forever and this one held in the Perth Mint’s historical collection is a prime example. It celebrates the investiture of 17 year-old Edward as Prince of Wales on 13 July 1911.

1911_POW_investiture_medal
Since 1301, when King Edward I of England imposed his infant son on the Welsh as their new prince, the title ‘Prince of Wales’ has been given to the eldest son of the British monarch. The location for the investiture of the 19th Prince of Wales in 1911 was Caernarfon Castle, one of Edward I’s ‘iron ring’ of fortresses built to secure his annexation of Welsh territory 600 years earlier.

The investiture ceremony itself (watch British Pathé footage here) was without precedent. The young Prince was the first to address the Welsh people in their native tongue and among those to pay their respects that day was a group of Druids.

As we know, Edward was never crowned King. His reign lasted only 325 days. But the “wild enthusiasm” of the huge crowd that gathered outside the castle walls on that perfect summer’s day offered no portents of the later crisis.

For the medallion, prolific Welsh sculptor Sir William Goscombe John portrayed the Prince three-quarters left in his investiture robes with a coronet. The bust is surrounded by the inscription ‘Investiture of Edward Prince of Wales’.

The words are repeated in Welsh on the other side around a rugged depiction of the castle walls. Reflecting the warm conditions, strong beams of sunlight are seen in the background. Other design details include the Prince’s plumes and the Welsh dragon.

Less than 5,500 of these historically important medallions were made in London from silver and a very rare 129 gold versions are also reported to have been created.

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