Apr 242015
 

Perth Mint employees who served during World War I have inspired two current members of staff to create a unique wreath to mark the 100th anniversary of the ANZACs.

RollofHonour14-18

By Tracey Cobby and Debbie Philpot

After many years of researching World War I for the ANZAC Spirit – 100th Anniversary Coin Series we decided to create a personal tribute to commemorate this year’s ANZAC Day. We had both recently rekindled our love of knitting and crochet, and in the spirit of the Australian women who knitted over 1 million pairs of socks for the troops, it seemed fitting that we use this timeless craft to create a special woollen poppy.

Of the 416,000 Australians who served in the War, 22 Mint workers are commemorated on a plaque on the front of the main building. It appeared that our idea of single poppy could grow into a wreath and commemorate not only those 22 men – but all those that served during the 1914-18 conflict. Our one poppy grew to 24 – one each for the men on the plaque – and one each for the both of us, to remember all who served.

We now know that other Mint staff tried to enlist in the A.I.F., but were exempt from joining because they were in reserved occupations. The Mint’s Hugh Annan Corbet was a Major and a Military Censor for the Australian Army Intelligence Corps during this time.

Goss_MillerTwo Mint Clerks – Captain James Miller, 29 (left) and Sergeant Gerald Goss, 32 – were killed in action at Gallipoli. The men enlisted in September 1914 and served with the 16th Battalion, departing from Australia aboard HMAT A40 Ceramic on 22 December that year. They died within days of each other – Goss on 30 April 1915, Miller on 2 May. With no known grave, both men are commemorated at The Lone Pine Memorial situated in the Lone Pine Cemetery on Gallipoli.

A third Mint Clerk, Captain William Bryan of the 44th Australian Infantry Battalion, was killed in action in Belgium in June 1917 aged 36. He is buried in Bethlehem Farm East Cemetery, Messines.

LEST WE FORGET

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Mar 052015
 

Rare Perth Mint coins collectively worth a million dollars will be flown from Melbourne and displayed at the Perth coin and banknote show on Saturday, March 7 and Sunday, March 8, 2015, courtesy of Coinworks. Highlight of the display, the unique 1901 Perth Mint Proof Half Sovereign and Proof Sovereign: the pair of coins valued in excess of half a million dollars.

Coinworks managing director Belinda Downie says that ‘Proof’ coins are collector pieces, synonymous with rarity with only a handful ever struck and never intended to be used in every-day use.

But what makes Perth Mint ‘proof’ Gold Sovereigns incredibly rare is that over the years in which the Perth Mint was operating as a gold coin producer (1899 – 1931), the mint only struck ‘proof’ sovereigns in three separate years – 1899, 1901 and 1931.

Coinwords_sovereign
Even rarer again, the Perth Mint struck ‘proof’ Gold Half Sovereigns in only two separate years – 1899 and 1901, both of which are unique.

Downie says a single Melbourne investor owns the 1901 Perth Mint Proof Gold Sovereign and the 1901 Perth Mint Proof Gold Half Sovereign.

The pair is unique and was acquired for $450,000 several years ago. Downie is bringing the pair to Perth after the owner agreed to a Coinworks request to display the coins at the show.

But while the Perth Mint commenced striking Australia’s gold coins in 1899, and is still to this day a major gold coin producer, the mint in 1941 diversified its gold coining repertoire, and began striking the nation’s coppers (pennies and halfpennies) at the request of Treasury.

The mint continued to strike copper coins until 1964, two years before Australia converted to decimal currency.

Following the traditions of the Royal Mint London, the Perth Mint struck limited mintage ‘proof’ (presentation) strikings of those coins struck for circulation.

In a tribute to the Perth Mint’s skills Coinworks will also display a selected number of “finest known” Perth Mint rarities out of this “copper coin” era, all of which are limited mintage presentation strikings and which include the 1947 Proof Penny, the 1948 Proof Penny and Proof Halfpenny, the 1950 Proof Penny, the 1952 Proof Penny and the 1953 Proof Penny.

The six proof coins will form part of a dedicated copper coin Perth Mint display prepared by Coinworks, valued in excess of $300,000.

Downie’s comments on the copper coins on display are as follows: “Well preserved proof coins of the Perth Mint are unrivalled for quality. The coins not only display superb levels of detail in their design, but qualities and colours that are simply unmatched by those of the Melbourne Mint. Each coin is a work of art, as individual and as beautiful as an opal. Furthermore they are rare.”

The Perth Mint commenced striking proof coinage as part of a commercial enterprise in 1955 and continued until 1963, before decimal changeover. At the show, Coinworks will display some of the finest examples of coins struck at the Perth Mint between 1955 and 1963, including the very rare 1955 Proof Penny and Halfpenny and the 1956 Proof Penny.

“The proof record pieces of the Perth Mint form an integral part of our currency heritage,” Downie says. “It’s an historical edge and exclusivity that underpins their strong investment performance.”

This article was originally published by Coinworks.

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Dec 112014
 

Every summer the prospect of prolonged hot and dry weather creates the potential for destructive fires in Australia.

And each year firefighters put their lives on the line to protect people and property from the devastating consequences of fire.

As well as permanent and retained firefighters, there are also thousands of volunteer firemen and women who play a significant and vital role in defending communities all across Australia.

As the nation once again focuses attention on the bushfire season, we’re honoured to share an image of this numismatic tribute to the courage and dedication of Australian firefighters.

Do you know anything about this medallion?

Do you know anything about the medallion?

The medallion’s obverse portrays a fireman from an earlier era carrying a female occupant from a house fire.

Its reverse inscription reveals it was issued by the Australian Assembly of Volunteer Fire Brigade Associations on the occasion of its 1990 National Conference in Adelaide.

Although in the custody of The Perth Mint, we know nothing more about the provenance of this medallion and would be extremely pleased to hear from anyone with any information pertaining to its design and manufacture.

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Oct 152014
 

What happened to all the medals produced in celebration of Western Australia’s Centenary in 1929? Glenn Burghall’s research reveals that they were presented to a broad range of people – from ordinary school children right up to the reigning monarch!


Approximately 85,000 medals were struck at the Perth Branch of the Royal Mint to commemorate the Western Australian Centenary in 1929, and about 85% of these were distributed to the school-aged children of the State.

Centenary-1929-medal_bronze

Bronze medals celebrating the Centenary of Western Australia were presented to more than 70,000 school children in 1929.

Friday 13th September, 1929 was earmarked as the day for local communities to celebrate “Children’s Day”, and with speeches and performances in the morning, followed by sporting carnivals in the afternoon, the format for the day was pretty consistent throughout Western Australia.

In one of the exceptions though, the older students from the hills town of Jarrahdale were able to visit The Perth Mint on that day to see how the medals, that they had received the night before, were made.

The State Government provided one shilling for each child on the school roll to help feed and entertain them. Local community groups raised additional funds to make the day a very exciting and memorable day of celebration for the children which would last long in the participants’ minds.

It was a day to acknowledge the contributions from those people that had built their communities, to reinforce the need for hard work and self-improvement, and to instil a positive outlook for the future prospects of the children, and their State.

When addressing 800 or so children at Busselton, William Mann, M.L.C., said that they should treasure and care for their Centenary medals, and although those present would not see the next centenary, those medals that have been handed down for posterity would have their true value realised.

Each child was presented with a bronze medal in small buff coloured envelope made for the purpose. This envelope was different to envelopes used for the medals that were sold, and on this type of envelope the price of a bronze medal is given as one shilling. Local Roads Boards were able to provide bronze medals to children, too young for school, at the subsidised price of threepence.

Centenary-1929-medal_envelope

About 9,000 bronze medals were sold, either by the Mint, or with the assistance from the Banks, through their extensive state-wide branch network.

For a period, The Perth Mint, at the request of the Government, suspended sales of the bronze medals so as not to devalue their appeal to the children. It was expected that they would not receive their medals until later in the year.

A special type of bronze medal was struck for the oldest residents in the State, and a local daily newspaper published details of those recipients on a regular basis. Another 94 of the special bronze medals in cases were awarded to winners at the Royal Agricultural Society’s Centenary Show.

Just less than 900 silver medals were struck, but only a number around 660 were ever issued. Almost as many were presented as gifts to significant organisations and people outside of Western Australia as were sold within. The cost of each silver medal was seven shillings and sixpence.

Centenary-1929-medal_silver

An example of the Centenary medal struck in silver.

Three gold medals were struck and the whereabouts of two of these medals is known. One gold medal was commissioned by Perth City Council and sent to Perth, Scotland. Another gold medal, struck very late in the Centenary year, for the W.A. Historical Society, was sent to the man depicted on the obverse side of the medal – King George V.

About the author: Glenn Burghall has an interest in Western Australian history and actively seeks out stories about the events and personalities from the State’s Centenary year, 1929. Glenn is using current technology and tools to give a modern treatment to items of interest from that significant time in Western Australia’s development. Glenn has assisted the Perth City Council with research into, and presentation of, a Centenary display at Council House, Perth.

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Oct 132014
 

Glenn Burghall delves into the background of one of the most important commemorative medals in the history of Western Australia.


The Western Australian Centenary 1929 medals were struck at the Perth Branch of the Royal Mint, from 1½ inch (38mm) dies produced in England, and from designs also created in England.

The obverse side of the medal showing the crowned bust of the then reigning monarch, King George V., was designed by Sir Bertram Mackennal, an Australian artist resident in England.

1929-Centenary-Medal-obverse

Western Australians were familiar with Sir Bertram’s work because he had also been responsible creating the Lord Forrest statue sited at King’s Park, Perth. Mackennal’s initials B.M. appear to the right of centre at the base of the King’s bust. The legend, GEORGIVS V REX ET IND IMP, is quite an unusual choice, and was only used for a very brief time on Canadian coins back in 1911.

The reverse design, by English heraldic artist George Kruger Gray, is that of an energetic and vigorous Black Swan, the bird emblem of Western Australia. This design was selected because it was thought to portray the spirit and character of the State at the time. The design was progressive in appearance, a bold choice with support from Mint officials both here and in London, but it was not without its critics.

1929-Centenary-Medal-reverse

Three other reverse designs had also been presented for appraisal, which included another by Kruger Gray, and two by Hugh Paget showing a traditional treatment of a graceful swan on tranquil water. All four of the reverse designs included the State’s motto “Cygnis Insignis” (renowned for its Swans), and the words “Centenary of Western Australia 1929”.

Kruger Gray also designed the crest and coat-of-arms for the University of Western Australia. Kruger Gray’s initials K.G. can be seen to the left of the Swan’s front foot below the fold in the ribbon.

The first medal was struck in an official ceremony on 15th March, 1929, by Lady McMillan, the wife of the Lieutenant-Governor.

Striking-the-centenary-medal

Lady McMillan strikes the first Centenary of Western Australia medal.

The next two medals struck were made of silver and were presented to Lady McMillan and Mrs. Ellen Collier, the wife of Premier.

It is reported that the press then began to make bronze medals at a steady rate of 40 per minute. The first medal struck, and two others described as bronze coloured, were then mounted in a piece of polished jarrah by Mint staff, and presented to the Museum of Western Australia.

The first medal struck had a surface analysis performed on it by staff of the University of Melbourne in 2013, and interestingly it was found to contain about 79% copper, 16% zinc and 0.6% nickel.

Melbourne Museum has a Western Australia Centenary medal in its collection which it identifies as being made of tombac, and an analysis of its makeup produced similar results to that of the first medal.

Tombac, or “Dutch Gold”, is a Copper/Zinc alloy with a higher level of Zinc, which was suited for use in medals because of its faux-gold appearance.

1929-Centenary-Medal-Tombac

Example of a medal struck in tombac.

Most of the common bronze medals sampled have a copper content of around 90%, with zinc around 5-7% and only a trace of nickel.

The medals have a diameter 38mm, and have a thickness of 3.5mm. The weight of the medals vary, but typically the tombac medals weigh around 30 grams; the bronze medals, 32 grams; the silver medals 39 grams; and the gold medals 62 grams.

About the author: Glenn Burghall has an interest in Western Australian history and actively seeks out stories about the events and personalities from the State’s Centenary year, 1929. Glenn is using current technology and tools to give a modern treatment to items of interest from that significant time in Western Australia’s development. Glenn has assisted the Perth City Council with research into, and presentation of, a Centenary display at Council House, Perth.

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Oct 072014
 

This month sees the launch of some special releases celebrating the 2014 Year of the Goat. These beautiful coins are magnificent collectables, gifts and keepsakes for anyone born under the influence of the lunar goat in 1931, 1943, 1955, 1967, 1979, 1991, 2003 and 2015.

Coloured Gold Coins

Coloured Silver Coins

For the ultimate silver collectable marking the Year of the Goat, this year’s Typeset Collection features Proof, Bullion, Coloured and Gilded coins in one stunning presentation.

This month sees the release of many more exquisite coins catering for a broad range of tastes and interests in the wonderful world of modern numismatics.

Happy collecting!

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