Nov 112016
 

To honour those who have died as a consequence of war, Australians are encouraged to observe one minute’s silence as the clock strikes the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month – the moment the guns fells silent on the Western Front in 1918.

The observance takes place in other Allied countries, including New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and the United States. But how did the tradition originate?

Edward George Honey has been credited as the first person to suggest a period of silence in which to remember the fallen.

Born in St Kilda, Melbourne, Honey was an Australian journalist who worked in Fleet Street after World War I. In May 1919, he wrote to the London Evening News appealing for a five-minute silence to mark the first anniversary of the Armistice.

A few months later, Sir James Percy FitzPatrick suggested to the British Cabinet a complete suspension of normal activity for two minutes during which everyone could focus on reverent remembrance.

King George V responded to Sir James’ call by asking countries of the British Empire “to stand still in solemn remembrance of the dead, who died that the world might be free.”

Armistice Day was renamed Remembrance Day in 1946 to commemorate those who were killed in both World Wars. The custom of a short silence remains integral to Remembrance Day ceremonies throughout the Commonwealth, and in Australia on ANZAC Day.

Honey is recognized in Australia as the originator of the idea on a memorial plaque in central Melbourne, which records “Edward George Honey… A Melbourne journalist who, while living in London, first suggested the solemn ceremony of silence, now observed in all British countries in remembrance of those who died in war”.

Australian-War-Memorial-logoThe Australian War Memorial logo is a registered trademark of the
Australian War Memorial TM & © 2016

The emblem and logo of the Returned & Services League of Australia Limited (RSL) are owned by the RSL and may only be used with the written consent of the RSL.

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Oct 252016
 

On this day in 1616, Dutch sea captain Dirk Hartog became the first known European to land on the west coast of the Australian continent.

Skipper of the East India Company vessel Eendracht, Hartog’ destination was Bantam, a trading city located in western Java. Using the ‘Roaring Forties’ to speed the ship’s voyage across the Indian Ocean, he strayed too far east – inadvertently running into ‘Terra Australis Incognita’ at what we know today as Shark Bay.

The expedition spent two days exploring the area. Before departing, Hartog left evidence of his landing in the shape of an inscribed pewter plate – thus creating the oldest European object ever found on Australian soil.

Dirk Hartog Australian Landing 1616 – 2016 Stamp and Coin Cover

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Celebrating the 400th anniversary of Hartog’s historic landing in western Australia, this stamp and coin cover features an official Australia Post $2.00 stamp cancelled with a postmark from Denham, the administrative town for the Shire of Shark Bay.

The superbly illustrated memento also includes an uncirculated Australian $1 coin portraying a representation of a view through a telescope of Dirk Hartog’s ship Eendracht and a compass rose.

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Oct 232016
 

Disney’s fourth animated feature, Dumbo, was released 75 years ago on this day in 1941. The loveable baby circus elephant was ridiculed for his enormous ears – but assisted by true friend Timothy, the tiny mouse, Dumbo eventually discovered he could use them to fly!

Celebrating the ever young elephant’s landmark anniversary, these superbly-crafted pure gold and silver coins would make nostalgic keepsakes for those who remember Dumbo when he first appeared, and exciting collectables for all modern-day Disney fans!

dumbocoins

Housed in Disney-themed presentation packaging, no more than 1,000 gold coins and 10,000 silver coins will be released.

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Sep 082016
 

StarTrek50

Delta-coin_anagram

TM & © 2016 CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved

The first regular episode of Star Trek: The Original Series went to air on the 8 September 1966. Almost exactly 50 years later, The Perth Mint has released a special silver coin in the shape of the iconic delta shield badge seen on Star Trek uniforms and starships throughout the entire canon.

An incredible memento, the brand new 50th Anniversary Delta 1oz Silver Coin could be yours! Simply unscramble the following letters for your chance to win!

Clue: Famous catchphrase inspired by Star Trek: The Original Series.

ABUMPYCOMETSET

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How to enter: Email your answer to anagram@perthmint.com.au marking your reply ‘September 2016 Anagram Competition’ in the subject line. Please include your name, address and telephone number. Entries close on 4 October 2016. Eligible entrants will be included in the free draw and the winner will be notified by telephone or email. Terms and conditions.

See us on Facebook and Twitter for notification of anagrams and other great coin competitions.

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August 2016 anagram competition winner: Congratulations Marcel Krawczyk of ACT for the correct answer of ‘Hawker Hurricane’.

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Jul 012016
 

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme. The first day of fighting on 1 July 1916 was the most costly in the history of the British army. By mid-November, when the bloody First World War battle had run its course, more than 1 million men from both sides had been killed or wounded.


The Battle of the Somme refers to a series of battles that took place between 1 July and 18 November 1916, during the First World War, in which more than 1 million men from both sides of No Man’s Land were wounded or killed. During the battles, the British and French armies fought against German troops alongside in the Somme region of northern France in an effort to break the deadlock of trench warfare and restore the fighting to fluid, mobile warfare.

Howitzer

The gun crew of an Australian Howitzer Battery, in an emplacement behind a steep bank near Lavieville in the Somme area. Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

The first day of fighting on 1 July was the most costly day in the history of the British army with almost 60,000 casualties, a third of whom were killed. Despite enormous losses, the offensive continued on for another four and a half months. Australian troops consisting of men who had fought at Gallipoli, as well as new volunteers from home, arriving on the Somme to take part in the fighting from late July.

GeorgeV

King George V, holding telescope, observing the fighting at Pozières from captured ground. The Prince of Wales is behind the King talking to two officers. Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

Australia’s contribution

The Australian contribution to the Somme was the capture and defence of the fighting around Pozières and Mouquet Farm between 23 July and 3 September. Like their British allies, the Australians also suffered great losses with 24,000 casualties, including 6,741 who were killed. Such heavy losses on an all-volunteer army put pressure on the recruiting system and resulted in a referendum for the government to try and introduce conscription. Narrowly defeated at the polls in October 1916, the issue polarized the Australian nation along political, sectarian and class lines. A similar strain was felt in Britain, which was forced to rely on conscription after the bloody battles of 1916.

Memorial

Troops of the 24th Battalion gathered at a memorial erected in memory of members killed at Pozières and Mouquet Farm. Image courtesy Australian War memorial.

The Battle of the Somme resulted in 430,000 British and Dominion causalities, plus 200,000 French troops. Heavy losses were also felt by the German army with 650,000 casualties resulting in a tired and dispirited force that would never fully recover.

The ANZAC Spirit 100th Anniversary Coin Series
Be Worthy Of Them – 2016 1oz Silver Proof Coin

This significant addition to The ANZAC Spirit 100th Anniversary Coin Series depicts a group of soldiers as they charge out of the trenches along the Somme Valley in France and the inscription ‘Be Worthy of Them’.

BeWorthyOfThem_Somme1916

The Perth Mint will release no more than 7,500 of these coins, each accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity.

Australian-War-Memorial-logoThe Australian War Memorial logo is a registered trademark of the
Australian War Memorial TM & © 2016

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Jul 012016
 

Born on this day in 1885, Dorothea Mackellar penned one of Australia’s most widely recited and beloved poems. First published in 1908 when she was just 23, My Country reflected the enormous love Dorothea felt for the Australian landscape.

These Australian rectangle-shaped coins are inscribed with four famous lines that have resonated powerfully with Australian readers for more than 100 years.

SunburntCountry_blog

1. A land of sweeping plains
2. Of rugged mountain ranges
3. Of droughts and flooding rains
4. I love her jewel sea

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