Jun 072016
 

New releases this June have been inspired by epic tales and achievements.

The ancestry of the Australian Stock Horse dates back to the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788. Bred for Australian conditions, more than 120,000 served in the First World War where their strength, stamina and courage earned them the reputation as one of the finest cavalry mounts in the world. Struck in superb proof quality, our 2016 Australian Stock Horse 5oz pure gold coin reflects its deeply rooted place in Australian history and folklore.

Almost 400 years ago, Dutch navigator Dirk Hartog left evidence of his exploration of the west Australian coast in the shape of an inscribed pewter plate – the oldest European object ever found on Australian soil. To commemorate the historic event, our Dirk Hartog Australian Landing high relief silver commemorative portrays the Eendracht, the East Indiaman that Hartog anchored near Shark Bay in October 1616 before charting the coast northwards.

In ancient Norse mythology, Thor was a hammer wielding God of Thunder who fought the terrifying serpent Jormungand. During their fatal final encounter, Thor killed the beast with his powerful war-hammer Mjollnir, but died shortly later from its venom. The second release from the exceptionally popular Norse Gods series of antiqued silver coins features a dramatic representation of their deadly encounter.

The Phantom is the hero of a long-running comic strip created by Lee Falk 80 years ago. Sworn to the destruction of piracy, greed, cruelty and injustice, the character has also been portrayed in other forms of media, including television, film, and video games. Celebrating his enduring popularity, The Phantom’s 80th Anniversary 1oz Silver Collectible is housed in a remarkable replica of Skull Cave, his secret hideout in the jungle of Bengalla.

June also sees the release of the 2016 Australian Kookaburra 1 Kilo Silver Proof Coin featuring a classic design of the world’s largest Kookaburra perched on a barbed-wire fence.

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Jun 012016
 

ThePhantom_2016_medallion

The Phantom, sworn to the destruction of piracy, greed, cruelty and injustice, was created by Lee Falk in 1936. A seemingly immortal being that has been around since 1536, he is in fact the 21th member of a crime-fighting dynasty who all adopt the same costumed-persona.

Featured in The Phantom, the most widely-read superhero comic in the world, the anti-crime crusader has also been portrayed in other forms of media, including television, film, and video games.

The Phantom 80th Anniversary 1oz Silver Collectible

Struck from 1oz of pure silver in proof quality, this 80th anniversary medallion portrays a coloured image of the Phantom in action in his jungle home of Bengalla. The design on the back includes a struck portrait of the Phantom and the ‘phantasy’ monetary denomination of 100 Bengalla Dollars.

The medallion is presented in a replica of the Phantom’s hideout – Skull Cave. A stunning display, the skull features a throne that slides out of its mouth to reveal the coin while at the same time illuminating its green eyes!

No more than 3,000 of these anniversary medallions will be released.

© 2016 King Features Syndicate, Inc./ TM Hearst Holdings, Inc.

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May 262016
 

Continuing his research into the Western Australian Centenary medal of 1929, Glenn Burghall uncovers the story of a special gold version made for King George V.


Midway through the Western Australian Centenary Year of 1929, the Deputy-Master of the Royal Mint, Perth Branch, Major Hugh Corbet, suggested that a gift of a gold replica of the Centenary Medal should be sent to King George V.

This idea was taken up by the Western Australian Historical Society, which set up a Shilling Fund for the purpose, and sought donations from the descendants of pioneer families. A ‘pioneer family’ was deemed to have been one who had arrived in the Swan River Colony before 1850.

In the following weeks there was a steady flow of small donations, and in the first week of December there was £12/1/ in the fund. Convener Vern Hamersley had concerns that they wouldn’t get much of a medal with that amount. The cost of a W.A. Centenary Medal weighing 2.2 ounces, struck from locally mined and refined gold, was quoted at £11.

On Tuesday 17th of December, 1929, a Vice-President of the W.A. Historical Society, Edith Cowan, performed the ceremonial ribbon-cutting to strike the King’s medal. By this time about £17 had been collected, and local manufacturing jeweller, J.C. Taylor, was given the task of creating an artistic presentation of the medal.

Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

Image credit: Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

The medal was embedded into a round wooden base made from local timbers, and surrounded by an inscribed circlet of gold which featured cut outs of gum leaves. The message engraved onto the circlet is quite lengthy, and the workmanship is outstanding.

The finished work was put on display in Taylor’s premises in Forrest Place, Perth, in the second week of the New Year, before it was then despatched to King George on January 20.

On April 22 the Governor of W.A., Sir William Campion received a despatch from the Secretary of State for the Dominions (Lord Passfield) acknowledging the King’s appreciation and pleasure at receiving such a beautiful gift and sentiments of affection.

From records held at the Royal Western Australian Historical Society, at the time of sending in her donation Maude Sanderson of Lesmurdie, had concerns that the medal would get lost in amongst the other curiosities she had seen in the corridors of Windsor Castle.

In 2014 the Royal Collection Trust placed an image of the gift in its online catalogue, and even though it is catalogued as “Box and Cover 1929” its historical significance is no less diminished. By publishing the image, concerns that the item had been misplaced, or even worse, damaged in the Windsor Castle fire of 1992, were dispelled.

The gold Centenary Medal is mounted with the obverse showing, which is quite unusual, because the main reason for providing the present was to commemorate Western Australia’s Centenary. The medal cannot be removed from its mounting.
Trust staff were also able to provide an answer to that question, finding on inspection that a bronze Western Australia Centenary 1929 Medal showing the reverse “rampant swan” is embedded on the underneath side of the mounting block.

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May 232016
 

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