Apr 262017
 

The genesis of Mother’s Day can be traced back to ancient Greek and Roman festivals dedicated to female mythological characters. The classical Greeks, for example, celebrated Rhea, the mother of the Olympian gods and goddesses.

In Great Britain, the fourth Sunday in Lent – or Mothering Sunday – was traditionally a day when young people working in domestic service were permitted to visit their mothers at home. As families walked to church, children would often pick violets and wildflowers for their mothers.

Across the Atlantic in America, the unrelated Mother’s Day celebration was officially endorsed by the Federal government in 1914. The annual observance was the idea of Anna Jarvis, who a few years earlier had persuaded a local church to hold a service in honour of her own mother. During the memorial, Anna handed out white carnations, which became symbolic of Mother’s Day in the U.S.

Like many other nations, Australia adopted America’s choice of the second Sunday of May on which to mark Mother’s Day. However, Australian’s tended to gift and wear chrysanthemums, a flower naturally in season in the Southern Hemisphere during May.

Today, there are more than six million mums across Australia who will be the focus special attention on Sunday 14. Whether it’s with flowers, some other thoughtful gift, or a family gathering around the meal table, the celebration of mothers everywhere will be strongly embraced.

Shipping information
For delivery by 14 May 2017: International – orders must be paid for by 24 April 2017 | Australia – orders must be paid for by 1 May 2017.

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Apr 242017
 

The First World War drew millions of people from around the globe into mechanised warfare more deadly than anything seen before.

Antipodeans rushed to the seat of conflict in Europe to do their duty in support of the Mother Country – Great Britain – in her hour of need. Unknown at their time of departure from Western Australia at the end of 1914, the Anzacs were on a date with destiny at Gallipoli, the strategic peninsula overlooking Turkey’s Dardanelles Strait. The bloody campaign is sometimes described as Australia’s ‘coming of age’.

Of the more than 60,000 Australian men and women who lost their lives serving in the First World War, however, more than 46,000 died in France and Belgium. Approximately 11,000 of these have no known grave. Tens of thousands more were wounded, some more than once.

For those who survived Gallipoli, the Western Front and the Middle East theatre, the sights, sounds, and smells of the battlefields would be remembered for the rest of their lives. Ultimately, their involvement helped shape Australian society and our national identity – one founded on courage, mateship, resourcefulness, and egalitarianism.

ANZAC Spirit 100th Anniversary Coin Series
1oz Silver Proof Coins

The Perth Mint’s 1oz silver coins from the ANZAC Spirit 100th Anniversary Series is building into an extraordinary collection portraying key moments in the lives of Australian troops during World War I. Working in conjunction with the Australian War Memorial and drawing inspiration from its extensive archive of historical imagery, each coin provides a fascinating insight into the astonishing mettle of the Anzacs .

Declaration of War 2014 1oz Silver Proof Coin

Britain declares war on Germany – August 1914

The British declaration of war on 4 August 1914 was greeted with widespread enthusiasm and jubilation across the Empire. In Australia, it was a chance for the fledgling nation to prove itself in battle and to rally to the cause. Prime Minister Joseph Cook declared, “Whatever happens, Australia is part of the Empire right to the full. When the Empire is at war, so is Australia at war. All our resources are in the Empire and for the preservation and security of the Empire”.

Making of a Nation 2015 1oz Silver Proof Coin

Australian and New Zealand troops land at Anzac Cove – 25 April 1915

In April 1915, more than 20,000 men of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (Anzac) were ordered to land on the western side of the Gallipoli peninsula. The ultimate aim of the Gallipoli campaign was to open Russia’s Black Sea ports to the Mediterranean. Even though the eight month campaign was considered a costly military failure, it was from this defeat early in the war that the Anzac legend was born. The Anzacs earned an enduring place in the Australian psyche, creating an incredible story of courage and endurance in the face of death and despair.

Be Worthy of Them 2016 1oz Silver Proof Coin

The Battle of the Somme – July to November 1916

The Battle of the Somme occurred between 1 July and 18 November 1916 with more than a million men wounded or killed. Australian troops, Gallipoli veterans and fresh reinforcements, arrived on the Somme in mid-July to support the British attempt to capture the high ground towards the village of Thiepval. Within six weeks the Australians suffered some 24,000 casualties, including more than 6,000 killed.

Many Never Returned 2017 1oz Silver Proof Coin

The Third battle of Ypres – July to November 1917

Australian participation at Ypres began during the Third Battle of Ypres between 31 July and 10 November 1917. Authoritative sources estimated that the combined total of British and Dominion casualties was 310,000 and the Australian forces incurred 38,000 casualties. A decade later, the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing was opened to commemorate 55,000 missing British and Commonwealth soldiers, including 6,000 Australians, who have no known grave.

A final 1oz silver coin in this compelling five-year series will be released by The Perth Mint in 2018.

PRIDE – RESPECT – GRATITUDE

Historical images courtesy of the Australian War Memorial.

Australian-War-Memorial-logoThe Australian War Memorial logo is a registered trademark of the
Australian War Memorial TM & © 2017

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 Comments Off on First Anzac experiences told through commemorative World War I silver coins  Tagged with: ,
Apr 212017
 

It was the flesh-eating monster that terrorised North America more than 65 million years ago. King of the tyrant lizards, Tyrannosaurus rex was a ferocious beast that literally ripped victims to shreds in its eagerness to devour them.

Standing up to 12 metres high, T. rex had a large, muscular tail essential for balancing its colossal neck and head. With only puny arms, its fearsome reputation was the result of massive jaws equipped with spitefully serrated dagger-length teeth.

Testament to its awe inspiring violence, palaeontologists believe that in one mouthful, T. rex could tear away more than 200 kilos of its victim’s muscle, bone and organs. The ultimate prehistoric predator probably swallowed small dinosaurs whole!

2017 Tyrannosaurus Rex 5oz Silver Proof Coin

The head and jaws of T. rex are portrayed on this king sized coin struck by The Perth Mint from 5oz of 99.99% pure silver in proof quality. The daunting image depicts the ravenous beast’s gaping mouth and lethal incisors salivating over the prospect of another kill.

Avoid being gobbled up in the rush – for with only 500 of these demonic dinosaur coins available for sale, it’s highly likely they’ll cause a feeding frenzy among collectors!

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Apr 202017
 

Henry Lawson is one of Australia’s best known short story writers and bush poets. Celebrated on Australia’s paper $10 note, he has now been symbolised on a magnificent silver commemorative coin marking 150 years since his birth.

Henry was born during the colonial era at Grenfell, the site of a gold discovery 370 kilometres west of Sydney. His father, Peter Larsen, was a Norwegian miner who had joined the New South Wales gold rush in the 1850s. In 1866 he married Louisa Albury, the feminist daughter of a station hand, anglicising the family name on the registration of Henry’s birth in 1867.

Life in the Lawson household was challenging. After several years of chasing gold, the family settled at Pipeclay (now known as Eurunderee), but the arid land made it hard to earn a living and Peter was often away looking for work. Henry was a reclusive and introverted boy with few friends, who also suffered from bullying. As well as the realisation of his parent’s incompatibility, he had to contend with a sudden illness that resulted in partial deafness as a teenager.

This 150th commemorative release features a montage of motifs reflecting Henry Lawson’s experience of life in the bush as expressed in his literary works.

Louisa separated from her husband in 1883 and moved to Sydney. A hardworking and industrious woman she influenced Henry’s life greatly. When she bought the ailing ‘Republican’, they edited and wrote most of the newspaper’s copy together. A powerful advocate for women’s rights, Louisa established ‘Dawn’ in 1888, a journal devoted to women’s suffrage which stayed in print until 1905.

Meanwhile, Henry’s literary work caught the attention of other publications in the colony. In 1887, the Bulletin published his first poem, A Song of the Republic. A year later, the prominent magazine published his first short story, His Father’s Mate. Henry would go on to be featured many times in The Bulletin, as well as The Australian Town and Country Journal, Boomerang, and Worker, among others.

In 1892, the Bulletin paid for him to return to the Australian interior where he experienced the harsh realities of drought, and he also worked as a roustabout (labourer) in the woolshed at Toorale Station. His works reflected his life in the bush, and the characters who struggled to make a living off the inhospitable land. Some of his most memorable works include The Drover’s Wife, Andy’s Gone With Cattle, and The Loaded Dog.

Henry Lawson 150th Anniversary 2017 5oz Silver Proof Coin

The Perth Mint is delighted to unveil this highly original release commemorating the 150th anniversary of Henry Lawson’s birth. Made from 5oz of 99.99% pure silver in proof quality, the design features a montage of motifs representing life in the bush as reflected in his writing – including a cattleman, swagman, cattle dog, sheep, windmill, bush hut, water butt, tent and billycans near a stream, as well as a bush fire.

The artistry is incorporated within Henry Lawson’s distinctive profile as portrayed on Australia’s first $10 note, which was designed by Gordon Andrews when the nation shifted to decimal currency in February 1966.

No more than an extremely limited mintage of 250 Henry Lawson tribute coins will be issued by the Mint in presentation packaging.

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Apr 112017
 

The history of the Australian stock horse dates back to the arrival of Australia’s first horses with the First Fleet of 1788. Bred to endure the harsh conditions of the colony’s vast outback, their agility, strength and endurance meant they became superbly suited to herding and exploration work. Today, Australia’s legendary stock horse is regarded as the breed for every need, including a wide range of modern day equestrian activities including polocross, camp drafting, and eventing.

Since 2013, The Perth Mint has portrayed images of the iconic stock horse on Australian bullion coins each struck from 1oz of pure silver. Within the maximum mintage of 10,000, a limited issue of just 1,000 coins is released annually for collectors in illustrated card packaging.

With strong demand for each of the previous four issues resulting in a rapid sell out, it’s odds on the 2017 Australian Stock Horse 1oz Silver Coin and Card will become another favourite!

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Apr 062017
 

The story of the First World War from an Australian perspective is told through The Perth Mint’s ANZAC Spirit 100th Anniversary 1/2oz Silver Proof Coin Series.

With three coins issued per year between 2014 and 2018, we’re now at the penultimate release featuring designs symbolising key events from 1917 – a year in which Australian forces fought in telling campaigns on the Western Front and in the Middle East.

As well as designs symbolising Australian troops at Ypres and Beersheba, this year’s set pays tribute to the vital and courageous work of Australian nurses.

The ANZAC Spirit 100th Anniversary Coin Series
2017 1/2oz Silver Proof Three-Coin Set

Front Line Angels

Nurses from Australia worked in field hospitals comprising little more than a series of tents, and on medical ships transporting the wounded to England and Australia. Enduring a constant threat of artillery, bombing, and torpedoes from enemy submarines, they provided medical, emotional, and psychological support for many soldiers suffering horrific wounds.

The Grim Path Back

During the Third Battle of Ypres, months of shell-fire had rendered the landscape desolate and waterlogged. Duckboards were erected to allow troops to move up the line to the fighting, and for the wounded to be brought back down for medical treatment.

Speed and Surprise

When Australian light horsemen charged towards the Ottoman defences at Beersheba in Palestine in October 1917 they faced more than 1,100 Ottoman riflemen, nine field guns, and several machine-guns. The momentum of the surprise attack carried them through enemy positions and on to a remarkable victory. Success at Beersheba played a role in the fall of Gaza along the Palestinian coastline.

Free replica badge for subscribers

A replica Returned From Active Service Badge will be sent to subscription customers of the five-year ANZAC Spirit 100th Anniversary 1/2oz Silver Proof Coin Series. Originally awarded by the Department of Defence to returned servicemen and servicewomen who had fought overseas during the First World War, the badge was worn to show the civilian wearer had served overseas during the war.

Bonus items for subscribers accompanying earlier releases in this series comprise:

  • 2014 – replica Sydney Morning Herald front page from 4 August 1914
  • 2015 – replica letter from the brother of two soldiers killed at the battle of The Nek in 1915
  • 2016 – replica silk post card of the type used by WWI troops to write messages home
  • 2017 – replica Returned from Active Service Badge (pictured above)
  • 2018 – to be announced

By subscribing to The ANZAC Spirit 1/2oz Silver Proof Coin Series, collectors also qualify for a free replica billy tin in which all 15 silver coins can be housed.

Historical images courtesy of the Australian War Memorial.

Australian-War-Memorial-logoThe Australian War Memorial logo is a registered trademark of the
Australian War Memorial TM & © 2017

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 Comments Off on ANZAC Spirit Three-Coin Set commemorates Australian courage and compassion in 1917  Tagged with: ,