Mar 112015
 

Most of us would be familiar with the traditional wedding day rhyme signifying what a bride should wear at her wedding for good luck.

Something old, something new,
Something borrowed, something blue
.

Often forgotten is the last line, which says:

And a silver sixpence in her shoe.

The practice of placing a sixpence in a bride’s shoe began in Britain. Sixpences were first made in the 1550s, meaning the tradition is possibly hundreds of years old.

Customarily put in the bride’s left shoe by her father, the sixpence was said to bring good fortune and prosperity to the newlyweds.

Wedding 2015 1oz Silver Proof Coin

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Made from 1oz of pure silver and issued as Australian legal tender, The Perth Mint’s 2015 Wedding coin is a perfect gift reflecting this wonderful tradition.

But it doesn’t have to be placed in the bride’s shoe! This beautiful coin comes in a white display box featuring a stunning heart-shaped crystal on the lid, making it suitable for any wedding guest to give to the lucky bride.

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Dec 042014
 

Please note the following deadlines for guaranteed Christmas delivery from The Perth Mint.

  • International customers – Today 4 December 2014
  • Australian customers – Monday 15 December 2014

Best Sellers

Some of this year’s best sellers include the Gold Filigree Egg Decoration, Teardrop Pendant with White and Pink Diamonds, Kailis Carbon Fibre Telescopic Pen, and 5g Gold Bullion Bar Pendant.

XmasBestSellers
Whether you’re looking for stocking fillers or a sophisticated gift, check the full range of Christmas gifts here.

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Dec 022013
 

2013XmasCoin_250Capture the spirit of Christmas this festive season with a 2013 Christmas Coin.

Struck from 1/2oz of 99.9% pure silver in proof quality, the coin is issued as Australian legal tender. The reverse of the coloured coin portrays a Christmas tree decorated with festive ornaments against a backdrop of stars with the inscription ‘Merry Christmas’.

With a mintage of 5,000, each coin is presented in a classic display case and beautifully illustrated shipper and is accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity.

For your chance to win this stunning coin, simply rearrange the following letters to solve the anagram.

Clue: A popular Christmas carol EllFortThinHow to enter:  Email your answer to anagram@perthmint.com.au marking your reply ‘December 2013 Anagram Competition’ in the subject line. Please include your name, address and telephone number. Entries close on 6 January 2014.  Eligible entrants will be included in the free draw and the winner will be notified by telephone or email.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for notification of anagrams and other great coin competitions.

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Last month’s winner: Congratulations Andrew Mckechnie of Queensland.

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Nov 262013
 

We’ve been delving into the tradition of decorated Christmas trees like the one portrayed on our 2013 Christmas coin.

In the past, evergreen shrubs and trees held special meaning for people during the depths of the northern winter. Pine, spruce and yew were used to brighten dwellings around the time of the winter solstice. Some people believed an evergreen sprig above the door would ward off evil spirits.

The first Christmas tree lit with candles is thought to have been the creation of religious reformer Martin Luther. It’s said he was inspired by the vision of stars twinkling among the evergreens on a winter’s night. Erected in Strasbourg Cathedral in 1539, his tree must have been a spectacular sight.

Victorian_Christmas

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert popularised Christmas trees during the 19th century.

When Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz moved to Britain to marry King George III in 1761, she took with her the German custom of adorning Christmas trees with wax tapers, coloured papers, fruit, trinkets and gifts. This ritual became popular with members of the British court and nobility.

It was not until the middle of the 19th century, however, that the practice became more widespread. Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s German-born husband, was particularly instrumental in popularising Christmas trees.

He used glass ornaments, coloured beads and paper baskets with sugared almonds for decoration. In 1848, an engraving of the Royal Family celebrating Christmas at Windsor beneath their dressed tree sparked extensive interest.

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2013 Australian Christmas coin issued by The Perth Mint.

Early settlers in the Australian colonies were keen to remind themselves of home at Christmas – but had to make do with native flora. From the 1850s, branches of eucalypt, pink-coloured Christmas bush or scarlet Christmas Bells were used to decorate the house, roof, or veranda.

These days, local cultivation of traditional Christmas trees means that Australians tend to follow the original German custom more closely, using a mesmerising display of tinsel, baubles and glittering lights for decoration.

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Oct 252013
 

The festive season will soon be here and as is traditional at this time of year, The Perth Mint is proud to present its annual Christmas coin. Click for full details of our 2013 1/2oz Silver Proof Christmas Coin and see below for this year’s Christmas Gifts catalogue.

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GIFT CATALOGUE

As the proverb says, it’s better to give than to receive. Enjoy gift-giving this Christmas with a choice of thoughtfully chosen gifts for family and friends.


FOR GUARANTEED CHRISTMAS DELIVERY please order by 6 December Standard Delivery or 13 December Express Delivery.

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Feb 112013
 

You’ve heard the myth about a stork delivering babies to their doting parents. In a unique Aussie twist on the story, this coin portrays a cute kookaburra carrying a sleeping newborn in swaddling cloth.

A perfect gift to mark the arrival of an infant in 2013, the 1/2oz silver proof Australian issue is housed in a presentation gift-card. The coin’s official mintage will be declared 12 months after release.

Buy now: Newborn Baby 2013 1/2oz Silver Proof Coin

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